Remove Students from Google Classroom

In the beginning of a semester in middle school and high school it isn’t unusual for students schedules to be adjusted. This means students may be enrolled in a class one day and the next week leave to join a different course. If the teacher is using Google Classroom this means removing the student from the course roster. This is a simple task which only takes seconds to do. It will also prevent inundating the student’s email with Google Classroom Notifications from your course.

Below are the steps for removing a student from a Google Classroom Course Roster.

  1. Sign into Google Classroom
  2. Click Student Tab
  3. Check Student to be removed
  4. Click Actions Drop Down Arrow
  5. Select Remove
  6. Popup Window Opens
    • Click Remove

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1st Weeks of School: Community Builders

The first week of school is here and teachers are looking forward to greeting both old and new students. The first few weeks of school are crucial for building new relationships along with strengthening old ones. This helps to pave the way for student success!

The very first day isn’t too early for introducing community building activities. Community building activities may consist of both digital and non-digital formats. The most important step to remember is remaining focused on the objective of learning about your students. When facilitating a community building activity it is important for the adult to participate too! It is amazing when students find a common bond how differently they interact with you.

Following is a list of a few digital ideas to assist with building classroom community.

Create a Google Slide

  • Use a Google Slide Deck to build community by having students answer a few basic questions.
    • What is your name?
    • Do you have a favorite summer food?
      • Add an image if you do
  • How do you feel about reading?
NOTE:
The first time the slide deck is presented it is with teacher created questions. You can continue this activity by using Poll Everywhere or Answer Garden to create a word cloud for input to create a Slide Deck. The second slide deck will focus upon what the students would like to learn about each other

Please click here to Make a Copy of the Template

I like to thank Alice Keeler for inspiring this template! Please click here to visit a list of Google APP Templates created by Alice: http://alicekeeler.com/scripts/templates/

Drop location pins on Google Map

  • Create a Google Map
    • Students Drop Pins on towns, cities, states, or countries they’d like to visit
    • The student will edit location card
      • Add name
      • Favorite movie, TV, Book or Game Title with image
NOTE:
The first time the Google My Map is presented it is with teacher created directions. You can continue this Answer Garden to create a word cloud or a Google Form to collect ideas from the students. After all the students will probably want to know different information about each other. Providing the students with this type of input may be empowering and supports building a stronger community bond. This method supports by giving a voice for choice to everyone in the classroom community.

 

Use a Google Spreadsheet

  • Add several Sheets to a Spreadsheet
  • Label tabs with food, colors, hobbies, towns and etc…
  • Merge several columns in the first row
    • This is where the question is typed
    • Title 1st Column with Named
    • Title 2nd Column with Answer
  • Share Spreadsheet as group activity
NOTE:
Students don’t have to provide an answer on every sheet. However suggesting a minimum amount of sheets to be answered will help the teacher learn more about the student.

Please Click Here to Make a Copy of the Template

Share a Google Drawing Graphic Organizer

  • Use Google Drawing to Graphic Organizer
  • Compare and Contrast what students like
  • Create one Graphic Organizer for each topic
  • Do this as a group
NOTE:
You may use the data collected from each Graphic Organizer and enter it into a Google Sheet. Create a spreadsheet with one sheet  for each topic. This will allow you to make separate charts to compare. This community builder leads into an introduction to graphing.

 

Please Click Here to Make a Copy of the Template

Tweaking Questions & Collecting Data…

Thanks to the NJ Ed Tech Team Google Summit  I’m now a proud owner of a Google Home. After playing with the Google Home for a few weeks I started to think about the value an inexpensive tech tool like this could have in a learning environment.

My husband and I noticed the Google Home has a hard time answering “Open Ended Questions”. Due to this one is forced to learn how to ask  “direct questions” to receive answers. It is amazing how quickly question formation changes in avoidance of hearing “I don’t know the answer” or “but I’m learning new things everyday.” 

Google Home

Once this artificial intelligence device started answering  the questions it was easy to understand how it could assist us.  The Google Home can provide the time of day, not only at home but anywhere in the world. It tells about the weather in one’s area, remembers a shopping list, solves math problems, answers factual questions, plays music, looks up recipe ingredients and etc… It can even play trivia games! This helps to hone our knowledge banks for factual information. I have mentioned just a handful of the interactive capabilities a Google Home may provide.

So you may be thinking how might this be used in the classroom? One of my goals is to support students with becoming independent participants within a classroom community. Everyone needs assistance at different times in their life. When a child explores and asks questions to discover answers their communication and critical thinking skills are nurtured.  This sets an environment where the Google Home may be used to provide a correct answer.  A Teacher would jump upon the opportunity to facilitate a classroom discussion about the answer.  This fosters an environment where student esteems are built rather than destroyed. Learning isn’t about spitting out facts but understanding the relationships of the factual information.

One way this may be used in an elementary classroom is though the tracking of daily weather. This is a common routine for most kindergarten classrooms. The student will still look out the window and share observations about what they see. After the information is added to a Google Sheet the student may ask the Google Home about today’s weather for the school’s location. This information may be added to the Google Sheet as well. A quick classroom discussion may occur if the Google Assistant provides a different answer than the physical observation.

This same lesson may be built upon for upper grade levels. It is one way to collect data which could be transferred into scientific or math discussions. This not only hones communication, and critical thinking skills but adds the reinforcement of using data for solving problems. The Google Home is a relatively inexpensive tool which allows the teacher to integrate technology in supportive ways for whole class usage.

Convert PDF to Slide Presentation

Recently I was asked if there is a way to convert a PDF to a Google Slide. In answer to this question yes there is a work-around to complete this task. First step is to convert the PDF to a PowerPoint by using one of the following website converters:

Second Step is to upload the PDF to Google Drive

Screen Shot 2017-08-20 at 1.00.26 PM

  • Click File Upload

File upload

  • Select the PowerPoint 
  • Right Click the PPT or PPTX from within Google Drive
  • Select “Open With”
  • Click “Google Slides”

Select open click slides

PRESTO! PDF is Converted to Google Slides

This comes in handy for those sites such as Teachers pay Teachers who share themes and activities as PDF’s and PowerPoints.

Gotta Luv It! Chart Auto-Updates in Slides

Thanks to the Google Docs Help Forum I discovered the “Auto-Update” ability when linking a Google Sheets Chart to a Google Slides. This is a useful and efficient feature for presentations which use the same monthly for presenting updated data. All it takes is a click of a button located on the chart to have the data update within a Google Slides Presentation. I can see this tool used in content areas such as science where data collecting may play an important role.

In science during a lab students may input data into to a Google Form. The linked class lab data collection chart from the Google Form may be placed into a Google Slide. This will involve linking a Sheet to the Forms. Students may use a Google Slide or Docs with a linked chart for lab write-ups. During the science lab the teacher may have the chart projected on a large screen. They may have students take a break from the lab to discuss the group data collection.

This provides an opportunity for students to potentially correct errors or use deep thinking skills to reason why their data may look different from everyone else. I feel science labs aren’t necessarily about getting the information right or wrong. It is about using “Reasoning Skills” to better understand a process. This is one way the linked Google Sheet Chart in a Google Slide may benefit students by supporting one of the most important “C’s”  known as “Critical Thinking Skills.”

How to Link a Sheets Chart to a Slide