Drawings Add Texture to Shapes

Google Slide Tutorial

Adding Texture to Shapes

Please click here if you would like a copy of this tutorial.

If you haven’t guessed, “My Passion is for Creating”. My parents use to joke how I was born with a crayon in my hand. It is this passion which energizes me to create with Google Tools. It is my belief Artists are “Abstract Thinkers” and as such naturally use both “Critical Thinking” and “Problem Solving” skills without applying much thought. Whether an artist is painting, drawing, sculpting or using digital tools they focus on making the design fit in a restricted space. This is one reason why I support the “Maker Space Movement” and believe the Arts” (both music & art) belong in school programs.

You might be asking yourself, “What does this all have to do with Drawings add texture to shapes?” As an artist I tend to like drawing by hand with pen & ink. However I find basic shapes and solids to be boring. My drawings tend to have quite a bit of texture and patterns. This is why I looked to incorporate texture into Google Drawings’ shapes.

I do think it is important to let students explore and create. When students share discoveries with educators and peers they are using communication skills. The communication skills the students are using support writing and the ability to restate facts along with providing details. So my simple artistic enjoyment for wanting to add texture to a Google Drawings touched upon some powerful skills educators look to build within a lesson. In conclusion “Let’s All Work Together Supporting Students as Creators!” for this encourages students to use both critical thinking and communication skills.

Harmony

Harmony by Barbra Drasby

Using Sites for More than a Classroom Newsletter

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Earlier this summer I started creating a workshop entitled “Using Sites for More than a Classroom Newsletter”.  While preparing for this workshop I realized the New Google Sites was more than the average website builder. When first starting to build with the New Google Sites I missed the flexibility of selecting my own fonts and embedding gadgets and etc… via html. Now I’m thankful for the new site builder! Once I started constructing the workshop prezo as a Google Site the potentials for using the new site builder dawned on me! I discovered the New Google Sites is more than the average website builder!

One of the first things I noticed was the share settings and the ability to add collaborators. Immediately I started exploring different projects based on collaboration. Using the new sites started to become a challenge for me to discover more exciting features and a variety of uses for the educational community. Yes! I did exactly this and discovered the New Google Sites was not only intuitive to use but a tool which offers a vast amount of usages. When one considers the integration of all the core Google for Education APPs along with the New Google Sites it delivers one powerful punch as an educational tool!

 Some Google Sites Ideas

  1. Share a Digital Break Out Edu Adventure with Students
    • Use critical thinking skills to solve the mystery
  2. Use to deliver daily objectives
    • Supports students with doing independent work
  3. Share a Community Ice Breaker
    • Strengthens communication
  4. Go Paperless Create an Anchor Chart Site
    • Provides students with 24/7 resources
  5. Student Created Collaborative Weekly or Monthly Newsletter
    • Supports collaboration, and communication
  6. Classroom Created Collaborative Notes
    • Created & Curated via Sites
    • Immediate scaffolding for students
      • Students understand other students explainations
    • Let students have fun with this!
      • Insert videos
      • Insert audio links
      • Share interactive websites
  7. Student Portfolios
    • Building Digital Resumes Practice
    • Reinforces Digital Citizenship Skills
  8. Share Infographic Projects
    • One page per student
      • Student builds info graphic by using sites
  9. Use as a Student built Wiki
    • Students share tech support
    • Share Math Problem Solving ideas
  10. Curate Student Artwork, Poetry and etc…
  11. and ?
    • Share your idea in the comment area
      • It just may be added to this list 😃

Teachers Helping Teachers

Crowdsourcing Powerful Edu Support

While preparing a “Google My Maps” presentation is when I discovered the “Power of Crowdsourcing”. Over my cup of morning java I had a revelation and created a map for sharing tips & ideas for using Google for Education Tools. I tweeted the map along with sharing how Laurie Guyon and myself were going to use it as part of our Learning with Innovative Technology Conference Presentation.

Immediately I was amazed by the responses from educators all over the world. This is when I realized what a “Powerful Tool” crowdsourcing could be. Thanks to the teachers who added ideas I  have expanded my knowledge bank with “NEW ideas” for integrating these tools. It opened my eyes to the benefits “Crowdsourcing” may have for supporting education.

How Crowdsourcing Supports Edu

  1. Use to gather information from anywhere in the world
  2. Creates an Authentic Learning experience outside the classroom
  3. Supports Collaboration skills
  4. Creates a new resource for information
    • Students can access info 24/7 from anywhere
    • On a variety of digital devices connected to Internet
  5. Strengthens communication skills
  6. Reinforces using Digital Citizenship Skills
  7. Builds a network of professionals
  8. Provides Authentic Feedback
  9. Supports Critical Thinking

Creating Google Slide Progression Bar

Recently in the Google Doc’s Help Forum a user inquired about creating a progression bar. Up until now I never really thought about using progression bars in Slide Presentations.  Thanks to this question I now understand there are times when a student or teacher may want to include a progression bar.

What Does a Progression Bar Do?

  • It helps narrow down steps into small digestible chunks.
  • Maintains order of the directions steps
  • Provides a timeline
    • May be used for social studies
      • Example:
        • Timeline for Mayflower travels
        • Historic figure timeline (from birth to death)
    • May be used in Science
      • Examples:
        • Life Cycles:
          • Frog
          • Butterfly
          • Plant
        • Part of science lab writeup
          • Students take photos of lab steps
            • Place the photos on a Slide Progression
              • Explain what they see happen in photos
              • May use arrows to point out changes
    • Uses for Math
      • A way for students to share the steps used for solving an equation
      • Show small chunks of the steps used to solve a math word problem

How to Create a Progression Bar

Progression bars may be simple or as complex. It all depends upon the point the creator is trying to make. Following is an example of a simple three slide progression bar where footsteps were used as the progression line.

Please click here for the above template

Following is the steps for creating the template:
  1. Create a slide include a shape with a number
  2. Duplicate the slide, duplicate the shape w/number
  3. Move the second shape to a new location
  4. Repeat as often as you need to complete the timeline
  5. Publish the Slide to the web

Cloud Print Saves Forms Individual Data…

Recently in the  Google Drive Help Forum  a user asked, “Is there a way to save Google Forms Data other than linking it to a spreadsheet?” My answer was, “Of course you can!” The user wanted the individual student data to appear as individual printed pages rather than viewing it in a spreadsheet. Thanks to the “Power of Cloud Printing” it is possible to save this information as a PDF File directly to Google Drive.

The PDF may be split into individual pages to share with the students or parents. Teachers can split the PDF into pages by using an online file splitters such as: “I love PDF” or “Split PDF”.  This will enable the teacher to attach the PDF page to an email or share via Google Drive.

NOTE: It is best practices and  recommend to link a Google Forms  Assessment Data to a Spreadsheet. The reason is due to the analytics capabilities built into Google Sheets for assessing data.

How to Save Forms Data as PDF

  1. Open a Google Forms
  2. Select Responses
  3. Choose Individual
  4. Click More Icon Screen Shot 2017-05-01 at 6.08.12 AM
  5. Select  Screen Shot 2017-05-01 at 6.07.05 AM
  6. Printer Window Opens
    • Select Change
    • Pick “Save to Drive”
    • Click Save
  7. Open Google Drive
    • PDF can be found in “My Drive”

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