Three Reasons to Use Slides for Video Note-Taking

School project research is evolving due to the rapid advancement of the digital world. Recently I asked a student, “Where do you go first to look for research information?” The response was, “I look for a video on YouTube.” Coincidently the same day I noticed some new updates in Google Slides & Keep integration which may help the student become a more efficient video note taker.

The first benefit of using Google Slides to take video notes is its ability to embed YouTube videos. You may be asking, “Why is it necessary to embed the video into a slide?” Following is my 3 Simple Reasons for using Google Slides to take video notes.

  1. It limits distractions such as ads and the listing for other video choices. The videos are viewable in edit mode.
  2. Google Keep may be open alongside the slide where the video is embedded. Keep allows the students to pause and take notes while viewing the video without toggling between tabs.
  3. Student will expand upon their ideas by adding a new slide to the deck. Keep notes are easily dragged onto a slide making it easy to add details.

How to Embed a YouTube Video

  1. Open a Google Slide
  2. Click Insert
  3. Select Video
  4. Choose between “Search YouTube”, “By URL” or “From Drive”
  5. Click  Blue Select Button

Open Keep & Take Notes

  1. Click Keep Icon (Right Side of Slide Canvas)
  2. Give the Note a Title
  3. Click Take a Note

NOTE:

  • Click Video to Play
  • Click Pause to Stop Video

Add Keep Note to New Slide

  1. Click Slide
  2. Select New Slide
  3. In Crumb Bin Click Keep Note More Settings
  4. Select Add to Slide
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Simplicity & Power of Authentic Learning…

 

This week I stumbled upon Wanda’s Terrel’s Tweet about Day 2 of #SketchCue &  at first thought, “what an opportunity for me to further explore using Google Drawings”. The focus of #SketchCue supports the tenets of learning to create Sketchnotes. A sketchnote is exactly how it sounds. One uses the creative power of drawing and design to capture notes from lectures, research, and etc…  Sketchnoting supports an individual with expressing their content knowledge in a visual format. I found this opportunity to share my Google Drawings Sketchnotes to be engaging and motivating. It was then when I realized a simple activity such as this has the ability to develop into a  “Powerful Authentic Learning Tool” supporting student engagement.

I found myself exploring clipart designs along with examining the meanings for the #SketchCue word topics. After sharing my first sketchnote and receiving a “Like” it dawned on me how this simple use of social media could engage students with further developing vocabulary skills. It always amazes me how a simple activity shared in an authentic manner has the power to motivate the creator. I found myself wanting to contribute new creations every day as well as enjoying reading the creative shares of educators from around the world. It became evident to me authentic learning opportunities are engaging and leads to furthering one’s content knowledge base.

My #SketchCue Day 1 Entry

Word: Arrows

#SketchCue Arrows (1)

My #SketchCue Day 2 Entry

Word: Banners

#SketchCue Banners (1).jpg

Linking Reading Log to Spreadsheet

Recently one of my blog readers requested a tutorial about linking a Google Forms Reading Log to a Spreadsheet. They explained they are a new teacher and not quite so savvy. This was a good lesson for me about simplifying my blog posts. If you are a teacher interested in creating a custom Google Forms Reading Log then the following directions are for you.

The first tutorial will explain how to create the Google Form. This will be followed by a tutorial for linking the Google Forms to a spreadsheet for collecting the student’s reading data. You will also learn how to copy a Form for making it possible to build a spreadsheet which includes a tab for each individual student’s data. This may provide individualized longitudinal data supporting the readers growth. It is possible to import group data onto a separate sheet for further study.

Beyond collecting data using a Forms & Sheets Reading log becomes a timesaver for teachers. It puts all the information in one single place making it easier for accessing the information.

Creating a Google Forms Reading Log

NOTE: You will need to make multiple copies of the Form. One Form per Student because this is the only way to link individual student sheets to One Spreadsheet.

Linking a Sheet to Create a Spreadsheet

 

NOTE: The above steps will allow the teacher to view all the students in one spreadsheet

Google Doc’s Speech to Text My Hero!

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I’m falling in love with the Speech to Text Tool built right into a Google Doc and Slide. It makes life a bit easier when I need to lay down and decompress due to spine issues. I can still be productive by typing using my voice! This is a lifesaver!

I have used a handful of speech to text tools and have found this one to be fairly accurate. Best part is I don’t have to train the tool to accurately type what is being spoken. There is a small list of voice commands I recommend learning to create the best appearing text layout. You can learn more about Google Docs voice commands from the following Google Docs Editor Help Center Resources: Type with Your Voice.

Create Illustrated Stories w/Google Slides

Students can now easily smash together drawing and writing talents within a Google Slide. Google recently added access to Google Keep from within a slide.  This allows students and teachers to drag drawings, lists and notes onto a Google Slides’ canvas. Over the last couple years I’ve heard both students and teachers requesting the need for a whiteboard feature built-in to Google Slides. Now thanks to Google Keep’s drawing capabilities this is possible to do!

The whiteboard built into Google Keep will allow the user to draw illustrations, graphs, write math equations and etc.. with ease. This provides another method for students to use for explaining content knowledge by using visual creation.