What No Special Voice to Text Tool?

Due to neuromuscular spine issues, my fingers sometimes do their own thing when typing on a Google Slide. I find using voice to text instead to be a valuable support. One challenge I have is a Google Slide’s voice to text tool is limited to the speaker notes section. Despite this limitation, it is still possible to use voice typing for designing the canvas area of a slide. 

One popular method is to use voice typing in the notes section. Then to copy and paste the notes section text onto the Google Slide canvas. If a person has a small motor or cognitive challenges, copying and pasting may be frustrating. Instead, I like to use my smartphone or a tablet device to voice type into a text box on Google Slides. 

Quite a few mobile devices come with a voice to text capability. If you need to install an APP for voice to text, try  GBoard by Google keyboard.  Note you may also need to install the Google Slide APP onto the mobile device. It is handy that more than one device may use the Google Slide from one account. I find it helpful to talk into the phone or tablet and watch the type appear on a bigger screen. Doing this makes it easier visually to check grammar or spelling errors on a bigger screen. Using voice to text for typing may unlock doors for many different people from young to old.

Which “Share Settings Do I Use???”

Due to my volunteer work as a Product Expert in the Google Help communities, I notice many users are confused about the levels of share settings.   Today I’m going to focus on the “Share Settings” found in Google Drive and its Docs Editors (Docs, Slides, Sheets, Forms, and Drawings).   Following is a list of the share setting terms and how they may help the user maintain privacy.

  1. Private – Only you can access
    • Nobody but you may view, edit, copy or share.
  2. Specific People – Ability to share a file or folder with another user.
    • You choose who and add the user to the file or folder.
  3. On: Anyone with Link – Any user with the web link may access.  
    • It is a public link that allows any user to see or share the file or folder.
    • The weblink prevents web spiders from finding the link in search results.
    • Embedding the link on a website or social media posts may make it searchable via a search engine.
  4. Public on the Web – The file or folder may be accessed anywhere on the web. 
    • The file or folder’s web link is easily categorized by the search engines.

Note: 

A  G Suite account offers an extra layer of sharing.  

The extra share settings are as follows:

  • On Domain Name – Any domain user who has the web link may access the file.
  • Anyone at Domain Name with the link – All users of a domain may use a Google Drive filter search to find and access the file or folder.

The above listing provides a basic selection of share settings Google Accounts offer.  Below I have provided an image tutorial you may print or use as part of an instruction tutorial. Keep an eye open for my next post where I will discuss more advanced share setting offered by Google Drive and its Docs Editors.

Control your Google Drive Files Privacy Share Settings…

In today’s world, one often hears people focused on privacy concerns. Privacy concerns aren’t limited to the field of education. People from all walks of life are worried about maintaining privacy. Controlling your Google Drive Share Settings may help you maintain a safe cloud storage experience.

Google Drive provides some hidden share settings which support maintaining the utmost security levels. The first rule of thumb if a file, photo, or video is for “your eyes only” don’t share. Not sharing a file is the safest form of privacy. If you share a file beware of what “Public on the Web” or “Anyone with a link” means. When a file is public anyone in the world can search and find it. A file shared to anyone is open to the public too! The difference is the second method should not be searchable by search engine web crawlers. Now to learn about the some hidden share feature for securing your drive files.

Sometimes there may be a reason to share sensitive files. Google Drive files may be locked down by taking the following precautions. A file owner may prevent editors from sharing access. The file owner has control of printing, downloading, and copying. My favorite safety feature is “Set an Expiration Date.” Unfortunately for private users, the expiration feature appears only in G Suite Accounts.

Following are directions for using the above mentioned Google Drive safety features.

Prevent Editors from Sharing

  • Check Prevent Editors from Sharing
  • Click Blue Done Button

Stop Commenters & Viewers from Printing, Copying & Downloading

  • Open Google DriveDocsSheets, or Slides
  • Click File to Highlight
  • Click Share
  • Click Advance
  • Check Disable Options to Download, Print and Copy for Commenter and Viewers
  • Click Blue Done Button

Set File Expiration Date

As an Educator I found this setting useful when sharing files with a long term substitute. When the school year ended the files magically disappeared from the substitutes Google Drive. I believe this is one of those worthwhile timesaving tips.

Note this Google Drive Files
Feature ONLY WORKS with G Suite Accounts

  • Open Google DriveDocsSheets, or Slides
  • Click File to Highlight
  • Click Share
  • Click Advanced
  • Hover over the person’s name, click Set expiration
  • Set the Date
  • Click Save Changes
  • Click Blue Done Button

Changing Bullet Defaults in Google Slides

Love when users help community question transforms into a helpful tutorial. Earlier this afternoon a Google Slides user inquired about changing bullet defaults. Changing bullet defaults can be a timesaver for both graphic designers as well as students. Sometimes it is helpful to guide others and show them how to use timesaving fun tools for designing purposes. Following is the video tutorial I ended up creating to help the Google Slides user.

Three Reasons to Use Slides for Video Note-Taking

School project research is evolving due to the rapid advancement of the digital world. Recently I asked a student, “Where do you go first to look for research information?” The response was, “I look for a video on YouTube.” Coincidently the same day I noticed some new updates in Google Slides & Keep integration which may help the student become a more efficient video note taker.

The first benefit of using Google Slides to take video notes is its ability to embed YouTube videos. You may be asking, “Why is it necessary to embed the video into a slide?” Following is my 3 Simple Reasons for using Google Slides to take video notes.

  1. It limits distractions such as ads and the listing for other video choices. The videos are viewable in edit mode.
  2. Google Keep may be open alongside the slide where the video is embedded. Keep allows the students to pause and take notes while viewing the video without toggling between tabs.
  3. Student will expand upon their ideas by adding a new slide to the deck. Keep notes are easily dragged onto a slide making it easy to add details.

How to Embed a YouTube Video

  1. Open a Google Slide
  2. Click Insert
  3. Select Video
  4. Choose between “Search YouTube”, “By URL” or “From Drive”
  5. Click  Blue Select Button

Open Keep & Take Notes

  1. Click Keep Icon (Right Side of Slide Canvas)
  2. Give the Note a Title
  3. Click Take a Note

NOTE:

  • Click Video to Play
  • Click Pause to Stop Video

Add Keep Note to New Slide

  1. Click Slide
  2. Select New Slide
  3. In Crumb Bin Click Keep Note More Settings
  4. Select Add to Slide