Annotating with Doc Files & Keep

One of the questions I often hear is, “How can students annotate math notes without a whiteboard?” My answer is, “When using Google APPS it’s not a problem!” There is a hidden gem called Google Keep housed in Docs, Slides, Drawings, and Sheets. Google Keep provides a whiteboard where students can draw and write fluidly with one finger or a stylus. When the student finishes white-boarding all they have to do is drag the image onto the file. The Keep image allows the student to provide supporting details.

Open Keep Whiteboard

Click Keep

  • Click Open in New Tab Icon

Open in New Tab

  • Select Pencil Icon to Open New Drawing

cliick Pencil

Annotate with Color

  1. Open Keep Drawing
  2. Double Click a Pen
  3. Select Color and Pen Tip Size
  4. Start Drawing

Keep Drawing Color.gif

Drag Image onto a Google File

  1. Open Google Docs, Drawings, Slides or Sheets
  2. Click Keep Icon 
    1. Located on Right-side
  3. Drag Keep Image onto file

Drag image

 

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Let Sphero & Google Slides Support Math

Sphero MIni Angels.jpeg

Today I’m reminiscing upon my time spent in an Elementary School Math Class, and the teaching of angles. I wonder what would happen in this classroom if the students first watched the teacher model drawing acute, obtuse and right angles. Then the students draw their own angles on paper followed by working in a group where a Sphero Mini is remotely controlled  to move along the rays around the vertex of an angle.

I see this as a group center lesson where one student is responsible for capturing a video as another student formed the angle using a tablet device to move the Sphero bot along the drawn pathway. Once the videos are captured the students would share them in a group Google Drive Folder. They would use this folder to insert the videos into a Google Slide deck. One video for each slide in the deck. This is where the student would write their reflections about each angle type.

The teacher might ask questions to jumpstart the students with writing their reflections.

  • Did the Sphero Mini have difficulties navigating the vertex formed by the two line segments or rays?
    • Why or Why not?

NOTE: The students may answer the questions individually or collaborate in a small group.

Once the angle slide deck is completed this may be embedded into a Classroom Maintained Google Site showcasing student creation and exploration.

Name the School Object…

Are you looking to do something different to avoid those “blank face gaze”. Send the students out on a mission to capture photos of everyday objects in the classroom or throughout the school. Set a time limit for returning to their seat. Once students are back in seats provide them with a link to a Google Forms where they will upload the images. Now open the folder and click on the Chrome Driveslides extension, and boom a slide deck of images is created. Brainstorm with the students how you may use the images to support the content area.

Example ideas:

  • Spanish Class:
    • Create a custom vocabulary
    • Write a story about the image
    • Add an audio recording explaining what the image is.
      • Vocaroo is an easy to use audio recorder
        • Allows you to save audio files to your drive
  • Math:
    • Create math word problems involving the images
    • Look for shapes
    • Find the area and perimeter of objects in the image
  • ELA:
    • Write a school adventure illustrated story
    • Describe an image and it’s usage
    • Create school how to tutorials using the images

Please share an idea in comment area…

Writing Math Stories using My Maps

The last couple of weeks I’ve worked on several different workshops and a presentation. This has made me think quite a bit about active learning and students as the creator.  I’ve also grown to understand students internalize their learning when it is meaningful and authentic to them. This is when I thought why can’t My Maps be used to help the students collect data. After they’ve collected this real world data the student can open a Google Slide and create a “Math Stories about the My Map Journey” they created.

The beauty of this is in the end the student may link the Google Slide Math story to the My Map Journey. Imagine a math journey where you can actually zoom in on the roads being measured. The student may include actual screen-captures of the roadways and locations mentioned in their stories.  A project like this can unlock the creative writer as well as the mathematician hidden within every child.

Creating a Directional My Map

  • Have students map a bicycle journey from school to a nearby location
  • Open My Maps
  • In search window type beginning location
  • Example address or name of school, store and etc…

Maps Type location here

  • Drop Pin for the location

Map Click Here to add the Marker Pin

  • Click “Directions to here” icon
  • Add a second location

map add 2nd location

  • Click layer where first pin was dropped
  • Drop pin above the second location
  • Title the marker with the name of the location

Map click layer.gif

  • Now click the measure distances and areas ruler
  • Measure between the two points double click to add the distance to the layer
  • Click the layer options settings (3 vertical dots)
  • Select open data table
  • Edit the table.
  • Under Description for the starting point type “0” miles & starting point
  • Edit location 2 with the milage from measuring & type from start or beginning point

map final.gif

  • Now drop a pin to add another location
  • Type the location name
  • Measure from the last location to the new location.
  • Repeat the process until you create an end point location

Creating Google Slide Progression Bar

Recently in the Google Doc’s Help Forum a user inquired about creating a progression bar. Up until now I never really thought about using progression bars in Slide Presentations.  Thanks to this question I now understand there are times when a student or teacher may want to include a progression bar.

What Does a Progression Bar Do?

  • It helps narrow down steps into small digestible chunks.
  • Maintains order of the directions steps
  • Provides a timeline
    • May be used for social studies
      • Example:
        • Timeline for Mayflower travels
        • Historic figure timeline (from birth to death)
    • May be used in Science
      • Examples:
        • Life Cycles:
          • Frog
          • Butterfly
          • Plant
        • Part of science lab writeup
          • Students take photos of lab steps
            • Place the photos on a Slide Progression
              • Explain what they see happen in photos
              • May use arrows to point out changes
    • Uses for Math
      • A way for students to share the steps used for solving an equation
      • Show small chunks of the steps used to solve a math word problem

How to Create a Progression Bar

Progression bars may be simple or as complex. It all depends upon the point the creator is trying to make. Following is an example of a simple three slide progression bar where footsteps were used as the progression line.

Please click here for the above template

Following is the steps for creating the template:
  1. Create a slide include a shape with a number
  2. Duplicate the slide, duplicate the shape w/number
  3. Move the second shape to a new location
  4. Repeat as often as you need to complete the timeline
  5. Publish the Slide to the web