Creating Google Slide Progression Bar

Recently in the Google Doc’s Help Forum a user inquired about creating a progression bar. Up until now I never really thought about using progression bars in Slide Presentations.  Thanks to this question I now understand there are times when a student or teacher may want to include a progression bar.

What Does a Progression Bar Do?

  • It helps narrow down steps into small digestible chunks.
  • Maintains order of the directions steps
  • Provides a timeline
    • May be used for social studies
      • Example:
        • Timeline for Mayflower travels
        • Historic figure timeline (from birth to death)
    • May be used in Science
      • Examples:
        • Life Cycles:
          • Frog
          • Butterfly
          • Plant
        • Part of science lab writeup
          • Students take photos of lab steps
            • Place the photos on a Slide Progression
              • Explain what they see happen in photos
              • May use arrows to point out changes
    • Uses for Math
      • A way for students to share the steps used for solving an equation
      • Show small chunks of the steps used to solve a math word problem

How to Create a Progression Bar

Progression bars may be simple or as complex. It all depends upon the point the creator is trying to make. Following is an example of a simple three slide progression bar where footsteps were used as the progression line.

Please click here for the above template

Following is the steps for creating the template:
  1. Create a slide include a shape with a number
  2. Duplicate the slide, duplicate the shape w/number
  3. Move the second shape to a new location
  4. Repeat as often as you need to complete the timeline
  5. Publish the Slide to the web

To the Moon with Google Slides…

Phases of the moon.gif

Google Slides is one of the many “Magical Tools” embedded into GSuites for Education. It is a versatile tool and often carries the “Stigma” of being a presentation tool.  The last few years I’ve discovered a myriad of ways to incorporate slides for supporting students of all learning abilities. Sharing slides in “Edit Mode” provides students the opportunity to use Google Slides as interactive and Collaborative Activities. Activities such as my “Phases of the Moon” Google Slides Interactive support students with independently learning content and internalizing the information through the use of several methods.

Below is a video explaining how to use the Phases of the Moon Google Slides.

Please click here to make a copy of this template

How does this Google Slides Activity Benefit Students?

  • Supports independent learning
    • Via Independent Research
    • Repetitive Practice
  • Supports critical thinking skills
  • Provides an opportunity to create
  • Can support Collaboration and Communication
    • Depending if used as group or individual activity

Using Google Hangouts On Air in Classroom

EngagementAre you looking for an easy way to engage students?

Search no longer and try a Google Hangouts On Air! A Google Hangout can play many different roles in a K-12 and Higher Ed Classroom. The hangout is recorded and can be reused as a classroom support or study tool shared privately by the teacher. Generally it takes minimal time to setup and run. 

During the hangout the teacher or person in control has access to a dashboard providing the ability to mute a user’s sound, audio and etc… In rare cases an educator may eject an Attendees  from a “Live Hangout” it they’re  not exemplifying “Good Digital Citizenship”. This can be avoided by reviewing the “Netiquette” Skills before using a Live Hangout with your students.

Live Google Hangout Ideas

  • Teachers can host a “Mystery Hangout”
  • Middle School & High School Students interact w/Elementary Students
    • Read to the class
    • Create a project with screen share
  • Provides the ability for an absent student to participate with their class
  • Classrooms can connect with global classrooms to collaborate on a project
  • Establish Student reading/discussion groups connecting two different districts
  • Eliminate travel for Professional Development
  • Student Study Groups
  • Invite a guest speaker

Please Click HERE to Share Your Google Live Hangout Idea

Teaching Students Collaboration Skills Using Google Photos

When students collaborate together creating a group project planning is a key to success. Generally there are rubrics or step by step directions to follow for supporting students with gathering information. It is not unusual for one student to pick out the image and persuades the others to use it with no real discussion. If it is a TRUE collaborative project built to have students communicate with each other then shouldn’t they discuss the images too?

Why not have the students create a GooglePhotos Album to use as a repository for images to be used in the group project? Each student would be responsible to submit one picture to the GooglePhotos Album, and write a short sentence about the picture.

Lifecycle Google Photo Album Sample

GooglePhoto Shared Album.gif

Why Use This?

  1. Supports student collaboration
    • Students can share reasons for image use
    • Comment area can be used to discuss the purpose of the image
  2. Opportunity for students to practice “Digital Citizenship Skills”
  3. Provides a shared receptacle for images
  4. Every student contributes input
  5. Images are shared in an organized easy to understand manner

Google Forms a Magical Tool

Imagine a student who does poorly on assessments all of sudden turning it around. Could it be possible for this child to receive 100% all the time? Why of course they can! Especially if the assessment is focused upon mastery. Imagine how this could bolster a student’s esteem. A Google Form just may be the magical tool you’re looking for!

Google Forms Magical Tool for Math

The magical force hidden within this Google Math Form is “All Students Finish with a Passing Grade.”  How can this be done? This Google Form provides more than one  opportunity to provide the answer. If a student answers a question wrong the next page leads to a repeat of the question with a visual, video or interactive support. After viewing the support the student has a second chance at answering the question. You can try it out here:

TIP: Answer the first question wrong!

The beauty of this tool is even thought the student has the opportunity to achieve 100% all the time it still provides valuable assessment information.

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