3 Tips for Using Google Forms

As a Google Top Contributor I’m exposed to an abundance of questions from teachers throughout the world. The following tips lists was created due to answering these questions in the Google Drive, Docs and G Suite for Education Help Forums.

1. Sharing a Google Forms…

It always amazes each year hearing the following question. “What am I doing wrong the students are requesting access to the form?”

This happens when the teacher copies and pastes the Google Forms URL instead of using the Send button to share the forms. Please follow the below steps to send a Google Forms.

FORMS DO NOT PASTE URL

Forms Send by Send button

Choose Forms Send Method.gif

2. Collecting Student Names…

What if a student forgets to enter their name? Is there a way to tell who the form belongs to?

If names aren’t collected from within the form there is no way to find out who completed the form. However teachers can prevent this from happening by using one of the two following steps.

  • Auto Collect Student Emails

    • Set the Form to Auto collect email by using the settings tool

Forms Click Settings

Forms Collect Email Addresses

  • Add a required Name Field

    • Add a Short Answer Question Field to the Google Form
    • Type First Name Last Initial in the question area
    • Set the Short Answer Field to Required

Forms Required Name.gif

3. Changing Submission Message…

Is it possible to edit the message a student receives once a Google Forms is submitted?

Yes, the message may be edited to add a mindful message. Please follow the illustrated steps to customize the Google Forms Confirmation message.

Forms Click Settings

Forms Click Presentation

Forms Type Confirmation Message

If you have further Google related questions you’d like answered please leave them in the comment area of this post. I’d be happy to answer them.

 

Creating Drive File Icons

My background is in special education and I’m always looking for ways for supporting  students of exceptionalities. One of the challenges for both young students and those with exceptionalities is navigating files. Today I’m going to share an idea of mine which incorporates using images to assist the student with finding and opening a specific file. This idea could be used for assisting the student with locating directions, specific classroom projects, independent work and etc… It is really a very simple idea which may save a bit of time and frustration for both the student and adults assisting them.

My last post was about color coding backgrounds of files to make it easier for students to find a group of content specific papers. Now if one takes the color coded file and adds one more step locating files may become even easier.  This step involves adding a specific images to the files within a student’s Google Drive Folder. When a folder is first open the student will see the color documents with images. Now all they have to do is click on the image to quickly locate a document.

Screen Shot 2017-08-02 at 8.06.10 AM

NOTE: If you are looking to expediting the lesson even faster. Add a Document with the directions using a large font size. This will save time for the student by letting them avoid opening the document but still read the directions needed to complete the task on hand.

Insert an Image

Google Docs, Drawings, Slides & Sheets:

  • Open a Google Docs, Drawings, Slides, or Sheets
  • Using the Toolbar Locate Insert 
    • Click “Insert” opens dropdown list
    • Select “Image” pop-up window opens
    • Click “Search”
      • Enter Image Name +png
        • (PNG will provide a transparent background)
    • Click “Image”
      • Blue Checkmark & Box appears around image
    • Click Blue Select Button

Icon locator Drive.gif

 

 

Navigating Chrome Made Easy…

Please Click here to Make a Copy of the Slide Deck

The above slide presentation was created for a workshop I’m facilitating about “Tips & Tricks for Supporting SPED Students” by using Google Tools. My day job is as a K-12 Special Education Teaching Assistant who has spent approximately two decades working with both elementary and middle school students. One of the biggest issues I’ve noticed across the board and throughout time is the limitation of organizational skills. In this digital age there are many tools which could be used to assist with organization. These tools when implemented as supports may help students quickly access the teacher’s lesson materials.

You might ask what does this mean to a student with physical, emotional or cognitive exceptionalities? Organization and quick access to information may be a game changer for some students. Over the decades I’ve noticed the “Stress” build on some student’s faces as they stumble locating lesson materials. This only sets them behind as they focus on finding the materials and unintentionally miss hearing or seeing the directions provided by teachers. It is my belief with the support of digital devices some of this stress may be eliminated for both the student and their teachers.

Using Chrome Navigation is only one of many Google Tools which may be used for supporting the student of exceptionalities. In an earlier post this year I shared about adding images to Google Calendar.  Visuals images assist some students with understanding information. Adding images such as Favicon’s without text to the Chrome Bookmark manager are less overwhelming then images with text. Of course it supports the student who has low reading skills. It also provides a cleaner look with less distraction supporting the students with focusing issues. Simple tips & trick which tend to be overlooked may eliminate stress for some students as well as the adults who support them. I hope you find the content in the slide deck to be helpful.

Add Images to Calendar Event Titles

I’m a visual learner and like when images are used to compliment words. This lead me to discovering a way for adding images to Google Calendar event titles as well as within the events description. You will be amazed by this simple and easy to use method for adding images to the web browser version of Google Calendar.  Using images in a calendar can be valuable to students who may struggle with reading. Teachers may use a visual calendar to support students with learning a daily schedule.

How to Insert an Image Into a

Google Calendar Event

  1. Open an emoticon website such as Twitter Symbols
  2. Copy an emoticon Image
  3. Paste the Image into a Google Calendar Event Title or Description

Screen Shot 2017-04-02 at 8.00.13 AM 1Screen Shot 2017-04-02 at 8.19.01 PM

Some Ideas how for using images in a Google Calendar

  • Visuals such as this can aide students on the spectrum with following their daily tasks.
  • Google Calendar can be used to create a behavior support calendar.
    • Have students add smiles or frowns throughout the day to log their reaction to daily activities.
  • An elementary classroom may use a Google Calendar to Keep track of the weather.
  • Share a project or Homework Calendar with images.

 

Students Whiteboarding w/Google Keep

Thanks to the “Winter Holiday Season” I finally had some downtime to explore more Google Products.  I have used Google Keep to create shopping lists and share quick synchronized notes. However I will confess underestimating the “Power” of the Google Keep APP to provide an interactive white boarding experience for students. Have you ever though about using Google Keep for screen-casting?

Screen-casting can be used to assess students knowledge of content. This is how this Googlicious idea works. The student will use the Google Keep’s Drawing Feature  to explain content while being recorded with a Chrome Browser Screencast extension such as Screencastify. The Screencastify is a perfect extension to combined with Google Keep. Screencastify allows the user to save the video right to Google Drive. I love when two powerful tools can be smashed together to provide one awesome learning experience.